All posts by NewEngland_Muse

I'm a traditionally and self published author. I write in the genre of children and YA at the moment but working my way up to adults. I'm a sports loving, photo taking gal who loves to sing/dance to my own enjoyment. I love to laugh even at myself. I am also owned by 8 birds and 2 hamsters, and yes they know it. :)

Charge what you are worth: Developmental editor

 

There are a variety of editors such as content and line editing, copy editors, beta reading and more.

I’m a developmental editor. That involves going over a book’s content and structure which can include loopholes, transitional issues, inconsistencies to name a few.

After I became published I started to offer services to fellow writers in my area for free. For four years I nagged the heck out of them. Not one bite. Finally I stopped asking. Offering what I was offering was not only free but a lot of time I would free up for them. I got tired of writers giving me the look. I decided to than charge. I mean after all, why not?

Of course after I assigned a price for my various services is when people remembered my offer and came a knocking. They were surprised that I charged now. But I didn’t back down. At that time I had two or three books under my belt and life was getting busy with my business.

Time was valuable for all of us.

My prices are bottom of the barrel and in some cases clearance sale prices. Still, the writers thought I was too much. I told them to check online to see if they could do better.

Plus, I showed them where the testimonies from previous clients were. How they were happy with how I helped them. People tried to haggle with me. I didn’t bite.

Being a developmental editor takes a lot of time, especially when a person’s novel is 200-300 pages if not more. I am going line by line of your novel

You don’t think that is time I should be compensated for? If you were me would you do this for free like I offered in the beginning?

Not sure what is worse. You have people wanting you to do this for free. Or writers who know what it takes to do what you are doing and still want that for free or as low as possible.

Charge what you are worth even when people in your own field don’t appreciate it.

Don’t back down. Your time is valuable. And if nothing else that is time taken away from your brand and your books. Is that worth it?

Guest Posting

 

There are many forms of marketing when it comes to your books and brand.

One avenue that I just recently been exploring is to guest post on other sites.

I have been gaining success in people agreeing to let me do a post for them. So far I have talked about how writing for children isn’t easy, a post on Jasper’s POV when it comes to him being part of a series to what has it been like to be a writer during this pandemic.

I have three on tap to work on at the moment.

This is a great opportunity for others to see what you are all about. Especially when that would be the only chance they would have heard of you.

It is challenging to come up with ideas for someone else and make sure it is as pristine as you can get it. But it helps one write down anything in a time of our country where writing might be the last thing on one’s mind.

Why I waited this long to tap into this is beyond me. But, I been having a wonderful time doing this form of, “Hey, look at me!”

If you have not tried it maybe consider it. You might just find that you like it.

Your writing Voice: Do you know it?

 

As writers, do you know what your voice is?

According to Margaret Maron, creator of Judge Deborah Knott: “Voice is the most important ingredient in a successful book. The plot may be clever, but if the voice doesn’t engage us, how can we care?”

According to John Morgan Wilson who writes the Benjamin Justice mystery series: “There is difference between voice and style though it is difficult to get at. To me voice is closer to attitude and the emotional quality of the prose, reflecting the personality of the author.”

According to Chris Roerden:” The first step in developing your voice is not to add something but to identify the ineffective writing habit and techniques you’ve picked up over the years and get rid of them.”

My Character Development instructor said he knew my voice and I did as well. Funny I thought to myself for my last instructor told me the same thing. This is a trend for people out of my writing groups who concur with these teachers. How come everyone knows what my voice is but me? I have read numerous articles on this topic. But I try hard not to think on this and just write. Apparently I am accomplishing the voice subconsciously.

Jason Pinter , former St. Martin’s Press editor states: “Voice is the conversational quality of your writing, the way you “talk” to your reader. It’s as important in writing as it is in conversing aloud with someone or speaking to a group. If your voice isn’t confident, assured, authoritative, natural, and appropriate for your characters and story, the writing will feel stilted, forced, ragged, weak, awkward. Just as speaking aloud is ineffective if one is halting, hesitant, lacking in confidence, and so on.”

This one makes sense to me since for now I can’t verbally express my definition of the voice. One good way is to read your story aloud. It may sound silly but it is a good way to hear one’s errors, pace and flow. Perhaps a writer will discover their voice.

Will I ever be able to describe this important ingredient to others? I do not know. Hopefully though my voice is being written loud and clear in my writings.