People that use ghostwriters: Do you consider them an author?

 

A lot of people uses ghostwriters to write down their words. So is this a job one would be interested in or not? Well, the definition of a ghostwriter according to Freelancewriting.com is: ghost writers are writers for hire who take money but none of the credit for the work produced. The original writer, or author, is hiring the ghost as a freelance writer to produce copy writer work for a fee. The author takes all the credit for all the original work produced, including all the original writing produced by the ghost writer. The ghost, who is usually paid in advance of completing the job, gets the money as a “work for hire” job and assumes none of the credit for the ghost writing work.

The plus side is you get paid and if you do a good job you might get hired again. The bad side is you get no credit at all for your work. And to anyone who is a writer that is a lot of work to put into someone’s else name to be on the book.

So why do I bring this up? I was listing to a podcast and the person listed a host of big names from athletes, artists and others who have used a ghostwriter.

So, do you consider the people who hire a ghostwriter to be an author? From the accolades I have seen given to those who have used a ghostwriters it sounds like they are getting the credit. They did pay for the service that can never be forgotten. But can they be considered by all account an author?

I guess it all depends on who you ask. From those I have asked the answer has been no. But still asking others to get a fuller sample for the question.

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Creating your book cover: Is it important to you?

 

How does one go about finding the right cover for their books? If you have a publisher that helps. I was fortunate to have one that worked with me in getting a cover.

When it came to my self published stuff I had to come up with it on my own. For my Squirrel Mafia book the pictures on the cover and inside the book were photos I took. The book was non fiction so it worked. Other covers I have tried to come up with pictures I could take that would work there as well.

There are sites that sell book covers for a variety of prices. There are sites where you can create your own. There are sits that sell stock photos that you can use.

What cover you use can determine how well the book is looked at. The old phrase, “Don’t judge a book by its cover”, is not one you want to adhere to. The cover is what gets your book picked up and looked at. Not taking the time to do so may not work out for you.

A few sites that people have used are

Carva www.carva.com

-Sparks https://spark.adobe.com/make/book-cover-maker

– Shutterstock https://www.shutterstock.com/

These are just a few that other writers have used.

Apart from that here is a blog post that goes into what you think about as you make your own c over.

https://blog.reedsy.com/book-cover-design/

Take the time to work on your cover. It can make the difference in your book being looked at or overlooked.

Book contract: Sign readily?

 

When I was offered my first book contract I was over the moon. I had a few people look it over and did some research to make sure it looked good. I signed it and we proceeded to getting the cover, more edits and all the things involved in getting a book out in print to the public. And the rest is history as the saying goes.

Time move on and things didn’t sit right with me after a couple of years so I asked for my rights back. That prove problematic. Very problematic to be more specific.

I could write a small book on what to look for in a contract, what to question and to know if you should sign or walk away. Things I did not know at first and as a newly signed author would not have known until something went wrong.

One has to ask questions, do the research and make sure your book and yourself are being represented well. It took such a long time for you to get to this point. Don’t get so excited that someone wants to put your book in print.

As a new author back than I did the research but I didn’t know what to be looking for or asking for exactly. I did the best that I could. And for the most part it worked out.

So what to look for?

-make sure there is a termination clause listed and that is is specific.

-make sure you learn when the royalties will be dispersed

-make sure you understand the double secret code some might use when they explain your royalties and how the money is divided.

-make sure you are able to contact them in time of need besides the website they run

-ask if they have ways of having your book reviewed and how they go about doing that

-what happens if they fold?

There are more but this is what cam to mind at the time of this blog. Not all of the above applied to me but from other frustrated authors.

There will be times where it all looks good and it could be exactly what is written down on paper. There will be times where blips will occur and it seems the publisher has all the rights while you have none. But there are many people out there who are willing to work with you in looking over your contract and helping you when times go south.

Don’t be in a rush to sign over your rights to your book. It is tempting but this your baby and it deserves the same TLC that you gave it while creating it.

I am more cautious with anyone who is interested in any of my manuscripts. And that is a good thing.