Category Archives: Writing ways

Do you have a space to write?

 

Do you have a space to call your own where you can write? Do you have a place where you can close a door and do the many aspects of writing?

I am fortunate that I do have an office with doors that can shut off the rest of the house. It is in my bird room. Yes, bird room. I been rescuing and adopting birds since 1998. Though my birds are no longer in this space when anyone in this house refers to this room it is not Sharon’s office . It is called the bird room.

It is a place for me to have space for my books on writing which can be extensive if one is not careful. I have space for file cabinets. It has space for two huge bookcases to load my favorite authors and new ones, to me, for me to check out.

It has my cork board and a nice size calendar to note when I need to put up a blog post, when I need to send out information through my author’s platform, deadlines on interviews, reviews and the likes.

Now while all one needs is paper and pen, tablet or a laptop to write, having a space to spread out is amazing. I can shut out the world, turn on some good music, have a glass or sweet ice tea or Pepsi and go for it.

The bottom line is I hope you have a space, regardless how it is defined, to write and do the magic you do when you create your WIP. A place that makes you sing internally, and maybe externally, and gets you excited to write.

Are you growing as a writer?

Are you growing in your craft? Just because you have a book published, regardless how, that doesn’t mean you are the expert in all when it comes to being an author.

One can always learn and move forward just like any other business. You see people getting certified and getting additional knowledge. This also applies to writers.

When I attended my first writing group it hit me fast how behind I was and how much I needed to learn.

I have taken classes on character development, writing fiction, learning how to craft and engine a story line and more. This has taught me that there is always more to discover.

If you are trying to get published that alone comes with its own set of rules- self published, vanity or traditional.

Once you are done your book you still have to maneuver how to market it through the rapidly changing field of social media.

And for me, someone whose English grammar was not the best, I had to learn how to write in a way that was not riddled with errors- past tense, commas, run on sentences and more. Though my biggest Kryptonite is past tense. I am the Queen of past tense.

If that is not enough than you need to learn how to do pacing, setting, dialogue, character development, story line development and the list goes on. No one knows how to do this 100 % from scratch. It is a learning process.

Hey, if you get to the point your book is published I commend you. For I truly know the work that is involved in getting this down.

But to grow as an author one must continue to learn the different avenues of writing. Else you risk the chance of getting stagnated.

Critiquing: Are you one who is constructive or destructive?

 

At one writing meeting I was told repeatedly about this new member who was amazing at critique their works. I was excited. While I had nothing to present this was still a win win.

The meeting began and this member showed up and sat down while everyone tried to engage with him. After a few moments to chit chat we started. The first presenter read a few pages of their manuscript. Starting with the person next to them the critiquing began. The highs and lows were discussed as we went around the table.

It was this member’s turn to speak. And spoke he did. He spent a lot of time tearing down what was wrong and smiling as he did it. He didn’t mention one thing this writer had done right. Instead he basically gave a laundry list of what they did wrong. Looking around the table it seems people were appreciating his brutal honest.

I did not. The face of the writer I could not really decipher.

Sadly there are people who relish in tearing down a person’s work and label it critiquing. For some reason my group translated this as wonderful. I translated it as someone who enjoyed tearing people’s work while feeling their work is amazing.

When it came to my turn I gave the writer three things that she had done well. I told her that one of the critiques she had received from the member could be readily fix and not as extensive as first describe.

Her smile was worth it. When I critique I always give positive and negative. Don’t get me wrong I will be honest when I give a review. But it can be done in a way that is constructive not destructive.