2018 NaNoWriMo winner:Yay!

 

As I mentioned earlier I decided to embark on doing NaNoWriMo for 2018. This is where you attempt to write 50K words in the month of November. Thankfully on the 19th of November I crossed that barrier at 50.065. I continued to work on this manuscript for November but not at the pace well the manic pace I was doing prior to getting the words needed.

I was reminded over the 19 days why I don’t do NaNo as regular as I use to. My first try was in 2011 and I won and continued the next two-year winning those as well. But the toil to accomplish this is hard especially if one has a job, family, one is ill or a host of other things . So I always try to get it done early. My best time was when I won NaNo in 15 days but that was harsh. But it is a good feeling being 4-0 as my record for this.

It is a fun thing to do don’t get me wrong. The people I meet and hang out is inspiring and motivating. Meeting new people and new writers to hang out with in the future is a definite win.

Will I do NaNo next year I am not sure. At the moment I think not. But considering how I decided I was doing NaNo 2018 three days before it started could happen again.

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An interview for an online media magazine

 

Check out the video about. I was fortunate to be interviewed by an online news magazine. It includes 17 questions some of which I had to really think on how to answer but it was good for it helped me remember things about my career in writing.

Here is the link:

https://easthorizonmedia.wordpress.com/2018/10/02/an-interview-with-author-sharon-c-williams/

 

Thank you Tarak and the wonderful work you do in helping authors out.

What is your voice as a writer?

As writers do you know what your voice is?

According to Margaret Maron, creator of Judge Deborah Knott: Voice is the most important ingredient in a successful book. The plot may be clever, but if the voice doesn’t engage us, how can we care?

According to John Morgan Wilson who writes the Benjamin Justice mystery series: There is difference between voice and style though it is difficult to get at. To me voice is closer to attitude and the emotional quality of the prose, reflecting the personality of the author.

According to Chris Roerden: The first step in developing your voice is not to add something but to identify the ineffective writing habit and techniques you’ve picked up over the years and get rid of them.

My Character Development instructor said he knew my voice and I did as well. Funny I thought to myself for my last instructor told me the same thing. This is a trend for people out of my writing groups concur with these teachers. How come everyone knows what my voice is but me? I try hard not to think on this and just write. Apparently I am accomplishing the voice subconsciously.

I have read numerous articles on this topic and when it seems the definition makes sense then a new article comes across my desk and destroys it, enter Jason Pinter , former St. Martin’s Press editor states: Voice is the conversational quality of your writing, the way you “talk” to your reader. It’s as important in writing as it is in conversing aloud with someone or speaking to a group. If your voice isn’t confident, assured, authoritative, natural, and appropriate for your characters and story, the writing will feel stilted, forced, ragged, weak, awkward. Just as speaking aloud is ineffective if one is halting, hesitant, lacking in confidence, and so on .

This one makes sense to me since for now I can’t verbally express my definition of the voice. One good way is to read your story aloud. It may sound silly but it is a good way to hear one’s errors, pace and flow. Perhaps a writer will discover their voice. Will I ever be able to describe this important ingredient to others, I do not know. Hopefully though my voice is being written loud and clear in my writings.