Choosing a Book Cover

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Every now and then someone will ask me to check out their book covers to give it a looksie and share my opionion on it. I enjoy doing this for in a small way I am helping a fellow author. Most of the time it is something small and nothing to write home about but that small change makes all the difference in world.

So why is it hard for me to look at a book cover for myself and feel totally lost? I am in the process of trying to further my work into the public eye. With the help of my amazing editor Nancy she has been helping me with book covers. Upon seeing what she came up with, I found something small. Asking me how would I like it, I had nothing. I mean I had absolutely nothing.

I know why it is easier for me to help others, I don’t have a stake in it. A book cover can be easily looked at and the little touch ups seem to just draw my eyes to them. Easy as pie for it is not mine. I see now why people ask me for my thoughts on this. To look objectively at one’s own writings and book covers is hard and the more eyes that see it the better to help this author in the best way possible

Asking my husband and son, and trust me I was desperate, they gave me some insight on what they thought. Even though they don’t get overly excited about my writings I felt they were the perfect candidates. People who were truly impartial and would tell me flat-out from yes this works to no.

While I am finally coming to a decision on what to tell Nancy I suspect this will repeat itself over and over again for me in the future. Well I hope so for that means my work is getting out there even if this little bit of frustration has to be dealt with to complete the journey.

 

 

 

 

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Links Links Links

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I love links. It is to the point I have to write them down due to my bookmark list is so long that it just scrolls and scrolls endlessly. But there is so much great information out there it is hard for me to read the article and move on. Here are ten links that I wanted to share with fellow writers and bloggers. Maybe one or two below will be of benefit to you.

10 Signs That You Are Not Ready To Self-Publish

http://ht.ly/ej5is

Premature Publication

http://marlamiller.com/?p=375

4 Lessons Running Can Teach You About Writing

http://www.writersdigest.com/online-editor/4-lessons-running-can-teach-you-about-writing?et_mid=588465&rid=3095949

7 Important Awards For Writing Every Writer Should Know

http://www.writersrelief.com/blog/2012/10/important-awards-for-writing/

Writers Got Talent Contest

http://writersgottalent.com/

Choosing How To Publish

http://www.examiner.com/article/choosing-how-to-publish

How To Plan Your Blog Posts for a Year in Advance

http://contentmarketinginstitute.com/2012/05/how-to-plan-your-posts-in-advance/

Three links about query letters

http://lynnettelabelle.com/blog/perfecting-the-query-letter-part-1/

http://lynnettelabelle.com/blog/perfecting-the-query-letter-part-2/

http://blog.writersmarket.com/whats-new/query-letters-101-how-to-write-a-query-letter-and-get-published?et_mid=563566&rid=3095949

Guest Post: Victoria Treder

What Makes a Writer?

We’ve all heard the line, “If you want to be a writer, then write,” but what kind of writing counts? If you want to write novels, but you spend your time posting to a blog, does that count? Sure, you are practicing your craft, but are you “writing”? Is writing in the eye of the beholder or the pen holder?

What if your penchant is for poetry, but your rent requires writing articles. Of course, you can say that you are a writer, but are you a “writer”? You know, the kind who gets asked at cocktail parties, “What have you written? Have I read it?” If your answer is, “I extolled the virtues of Jenny Craig over Weight Watchers in the latest issue of Glamour,” you’re liable to get a blank look in response. If you can at least say, “In last month’s Cosmo, I raved about this little known island in the Pacific. Have you ever heard of Atuitaki?”, you’ll get a bit of wide-eyed interest back. Travel is fun and exciting. Dieting is not.

The only way to get respect for writing how-to’s on mundane subjects is to squeeze out an entire book. An article on choosing the right college elicits only yawns, but a book on How to Get the Most Out of Your College Experience rates oohs and aahs. Making a living explaining the dull, everyday stuff pegs you as in it just for the money, unless you can manage to cobble together a sufficient number of words for independent publication, a feat that immediately elevates you to the status of “author”. But what if you’ve published your How-To book? Are you then a “writer”, if your dream is to publish a novel? Or are you just a hack with a knack for stringing together a lot of words?

What makes a writer? Is it the content, the length, or the aspirations of the person herself? If you are making a living writing articles for magazines, a job that others only dream of, are you a writer if you really prefer to pen poignant short stories on the meaning of life?

Is the definition of writer determined by you, or by others? Is there a difference between calling yourself a “writer”, and saying that you write for a living? There are millions of words that surround us every day; someone has set them down in a particular order; someone has put some thought into their placement. Is it the thought that makes a writer? Or the ultimate goal the writer seeks to attain?

Is writing just another skill? Or is it a calling? Is it the level of discourse that determines, or the mechanism through which writers choose to communicate?  I don’t know about the rest of you, but I chose to call myself a writer when I first decided to write fiction, even though so far I have been paid only for my non-fiction work. I have a streak of romanticism that refuses to be subdued.

Guest blogger Victoria Treder blogs about politics, education, and the state of our nation at http://tredalong.com/